Andrea del Sarto (1486-1530)

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For all your Del Sarto artworks you need a Certificate of Authenticity (COA) in order to sell, to insure or to donate for a tax deduction.

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We have been authenticating Del Sarto and issuing certificates of authenticity since 2002. We are recognized Del Sarto experts and Del Sarto certified appraisers. We issue COAs and appraisals for all Del Sarto artworks.

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The Del Sarto certificates of authenticity we issue are based on solid, reliable and fully referenced art investigations, authentication research, analytical work and forensic studies.

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You will generally receive your certificates of authenticity and authentication report within two weeks. Some complicated cases with difficult to research Del Sarto paintings or drawings take longer.

Our clients include Del Sarto collectors, investors, tax authorities, insurance adjusters, appraisers, valuers, auctioneers, Federal agencies and many law firms.

We perform Andrea del Sarto art authentication, appraisal, certificates of authenticity (COA), analysis, research, scientific tests, full art authentications. We will help you sell your Andrea del Sarto or we will sell it for you.

Andrea del Sarto was one of the most accomplished draftsmen of the High Renaissance and one of its most significant painters. He spent his entire life, in Florence, except for a year in France. His father was a tailor, hence the nickname “del Sarto’ which means of the tailor.

del Sarto Painting, Virgin with the Child and Saints

Virgin with the Child and Saints

del Sarto Painting, The Annunciation

The Annunciation

del Sarto Painting, Virign with Four Saints

Virign with Four Saints

del Sarto Painting, Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

Del Sarto’s studio was among the most prolific of the early 16th century producing hundreds of drawings and paintings. Del Sarto trained under Piero di Cosimo and other eminent artists of his time. His art shows exposure to the work of Raphael and Fra Bartolommeo, his contemporaries in Florence. Among del Sarto’s influences was Leonardo da Vinci, from whom he adopted the technique sfumato, which means the blending of colors so that they subtly mesh with each other like smoke. But del Sarto used warmer, more mellow tones than Leonardo.

del Sarto Painting, Lamentation of Christ, 1520

Lamentation of Christ, 1520

del Sarto Painting, John the Baptist

John the Baptist

del Sarto Painting, The Virgin and the Infant with Saint Elizabeth and John the Baptist

The Virgin and the Infant with Saint Elizabeth and John the Baptist

Andrea del Sarto’s students included Pontormo, Squazzella, Fiorentino, Salviati, del Conte, and del Buda. His student, Giorgio Vasari, caused a scandal about del Sarto. Vasari vilified del Sarto’s wealthy wife (the widow Lucrezia del Fede), and her supposed malign influence on del Sarto. Most of these accusations have been proven false, and they were taken out of later editions of Vasari’s account of del Sarto’s life. Vasari’s gossip, however, did influence Ernest Jones, a student of Freud, who in 1913 wrote about the deleterious influence of the dominant Lucrezia on the art of del Sarto, and also the poet Robert Browning who wrote on a similar theme in 1855. By the mid-20th century, however, del Sarto’s reputation was restored.

del Sarto Painting, Madonna of the Harpies

Madonna of the Harpies

del Sarto Painting, Portrait of the Artists Wife

Portrait of the Artists Wife

Del Sarto is renowned for his altarpieces (among them The Madonna of the Harpies, now at the Uffizi in Florence), and frescoes, prominent examples of which are in Florence at Chiostro dello Scalzo and SS Annunziata. Del Sarto’s portraits are also considered among the outstanding examples from the first part of the 16th century.

del Sarto Painting, Portrait of a Young Man

Portrait of a Young Man * Thought to be a self-portrait of the artist

del Sarto Painting, St. Sebastian Holding Two Arrows and the Palm of Martyrdom

St. Sebastian Holding Two Arrows and the Palm of Martyrdom

del Sarto Painting, The Holy Family

The Holy Family

del Sarto Sketch, Figure Studies

Figure Studies

del Sarto Painting, Pope Leo X Group Portrait by Del Sarto

Pope Leo X Group Portrait by del Sarto

Coutesy insecula.com
del Sarto Painting, The Holy Family

Pope Leo X Group Portrait by Raphael

del Sarto Painting, The Last Supper, Fresco, Convent of San Salvi, Florence

The Last Supper, Fresco, Convent of San Salvi, Florence

 

Sarto Discoveries

art

A painting Madonna and Child by Andrea del Sarto was rediscovered in 2001 after having disappeared in 1649. It was one of the last paintings completed by del Sarto before he died in 1530. The painting is currently in a private collection.

Please contact Art Experts if you have any questions about your del Sarto drawing or painting.

 

 

 

 

del Sarto Painting, Madonna and Child

Madonna and Child